TRAGIC WORSHIP, PART 2

Yesterday, we discussed things we can do to equip ourselves for times of struggle within the church.

Today, we’ll look at what to do when the church is already hurting. How can we lead our people well, with grace and faithfulness?

While leading the church during a ‘church-wide’ crisis is a bit easier to process, we also have to realize that, if our people are connected with each other, then even one or two personal struggles can create a ripple-effect of hurting.

I welcome your comments. Many of you have endured church trial and you’ve seen firsthand how worship leaders have served the congregation in hard days. Maybe you’ve got some wisdom to offer us…trust me, we need it!

Here are a few suggested ways to lead your people in hard times.

#1. MODEL IT.
Start the service five minutes late…take a minute or two to sit in the pew with that person. Hug them. Ask them how they’re doing. Forget the green room and be visible. You’ll often find that even the smallest act of comfort will immediately ignite that same desire in others.

#2. BE HONEST.
Talk to your pastor about ways that you can honestly lovingly minister to your people. If you have to cut a song and get off stage to make time for pastoral prayer, do it. If you’ve got hurting people, no amount of posturing or stage dramatics or pump-up-the-crowd music is going to erase that from their minds. Acknowledge it and minister to it.

#3. SHARE HOPE.
This is the hardest part of leading hurting people. While we want to be sensitive and caring, we also know that Jesus is our hope. This is where an extensive song catalog can really bless your congregation. Sing about Jesus bearing our sin and the weight of death. Sing about heaven, that God reigns victorious and that Jesus has prepared a place for us where no tears are shed. Sing about peace. Don’t give easy answers. Give the hope of Jesus.

How have you seen this done? What are ways you’ve seen worship leaders do a good job of serving hurting people?

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